Low Carb Mistakes – Net Carbs – Part 2 – Fiber

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So as we discussed in Part 1 (HERE), some that adopt a low carb lifestyle use a formula called “Net Carbs.” Net carbs is total carbs, minus fiber. Some also deduct sugar alcohols. We learned in Part 1 about sugar alcohols. So what about fiber?

Well, I want to show you my blood glucose readings from two different meals, both with macronutrients about 70% fat, 20% protein and 5% “net carbs”. In this first meal, there was about 8-10g “net carbs.” The carbs came from non-starchy vegetables and nuts. Here are my blood sugar results…a one point increase in blood glucose (1.2% increase).

Before Meal

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One Hour After Meal

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Two Hours After Meal

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In this next meal, there was LESS NET CARBS, only 6g “net carbs,” but this time, from a processed, packaged “low carb” tortilla. (I hope you all appreciate the lengths I’m willing to go to teach because I haven’t had wheat in about 3 years, lol!!). Here are my blood sugar results. (I did testing every half hour as I suspected a greater difference.)  I experienced a near 40 point increase (48% increase) in blood glucose.

Before Meal

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One-Half Hour After Meal

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One Hour After Meal

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One and One-Half Hours After Meal

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Two Hours After Meal

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Three Hours After Meal

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HERE IS AN EVEN MORE DISTURBING FACT.  AT FOUR HOURS AFTER MEAL, MY BLOOD GLUCOSE WAS STILL NOT BACK TO BASELINE.  As a point of reference, at two hours post meal, a person without diabetes is expected to be back to pre-meal blood glucose levels. Certainly this would be true at four hours post meal.  So now, at about the time for another meal, rather than starting my meal with a BG in the 80’s where I should be, I’m starting my next meal with elevated glucose.  At 4 hours, my blood glucose is still 32% elevated over my baseline blood glucose.  Can you see how this could become a problem?

Four Hours After Meal

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Remember, I am someone who fully controls my blood glucose with my diet and lifestyle.  I rarely allow my blood glucose over 110.  If this is happening to a person with good blood glucose control, imagine what it is doing to someone who is not well controlled?  (Also, it has nothing to do with the meter.  I use both meters regularly depending on what strips I have.  I’ve tested both of these meters in a medical lab and they were only two points away from each other.  I also used the same test site for all sticks.)

What do I want you to take away from this?

  1. THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS A LOW CARB GRAIN. Please, please, please do not be fooled by low carb marketing gimmicks.
  2. Do not deduct fiber from packaged, processed foods. If you wish to deduct fiber, only deduct fiber from REAL food without a label (example: non-starchy veggies.  Once again, for those wishing to maintain dietary ketosis, always count total carbs.)
  3. Always test your INDIVIDUAL response to foods rather than believing health claims on a package.  (Food manufacturers have been known to be deceptive in their marketing practices.)
  4. I love you folks enough to eat wheat for you, lol!!

Here is a similar experiment with processed “low carb” bread.  (HERE)

And “low carb” pasta (HERE)

Bottom line…if it comes in a package with a health claim, be VERY suspicious, and test, test, test.

Wishing you health and happiness!

For “Low Carb Mistakes – Net Carbs – Part 1 – Sugar Alcohols” click HERE.